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HISTORY OF THE MILITARY TATTOO


Two million veterans currently carry with them one of the most identifiable and permanent symbols of military service ever used – the tattoo.  Although it was once solely the realm of barnacled sailors and outlaw bikers, tattoos are now so mainstream that they have almost become a requirement for celebrities.  However, the military tattoo is a special case, with a foot in two worlds.  In one sense, military tattoos are much like any other type of tattoo, serving many personal purposes ranging from mementos, milestones, and memorials to risk-taking behavior, sheer body adornment, and even curiosity. In the other sense though, in their long and varied past, these symbols in the skin have also managed to capture not only personal history but military history as well.

The Ice Man of the AlpsMilitary themes in tattooing are no recent fad.  In fact, the world over, tattooing in general may go back as early as the Paleolithic or Stone age.  Unfortunately we will never know where or when tattooing actually originated since human skin does not preserve well, except in the most extraordinary of circumstances.  Perhaps the most famous of all ancient tattooed people is Otzi, the Ice Man of the Alps who was discovered in 1991.  His mummy, created by having been covered with glacial ice shortly after his death, is the oldest known human skin ever discovered – 5,300 years old – and it is tattooed.  Otzi has 59 separate tattoos, consisting of small dark blue dots, plus signs, and short parallel lines.  Speculation about the meaning of his tattoos abounds but two of the most interesting interpretations are that his tattoos are therapeutic (located directly over arthritic areas of his body) or that they signaled membership in a group (perhaps an ethnic or tribal group).  In this latter interpretation, we begin to see some of the earliest precursors to military tattoos, specifically the projection of group identity.  One of the most famous of generals in human history was keen to observe much the same in one of his opponents

In 50 BC, Julius Caesar wrote in his Commentaries on the Gallic Wars that during his campaigns in Britain in 55 and 54 BC he observed that “all Britons paint themselves with woad, which turns the skin a bluish-green color; hence their appearance is all the more horrific in battle”.  While Caesar uses the word paint, later historians speak specifically of tattoos and modern historians believe that the warriors who faced Caesar were in fact tattooed.  In these earliest of references to tattoos and military action the emphasis is on intimidation.  Caesar reinforces that thought by describing them as horrific, not simply blue.  The purpose of the tattoos from the viewpoint of the Britons themselves is not recorded.  If their intent was to daunt their foe, then they were successful.  There are, however, other psychological and emotional byproducts of being tattooed.  The process of receiving one is painful.  It is a pigment, inserted through the epidermis (typically with a puncturing tool such as a needle) into the dermis, where it remains permanently beneath that first layer skin.  Some blood (though not much) will be spilled and infection is risked.  People who endure the process, especially if that process is imbued with some ritualistic and symbolic meaning, as was often the case for early peoples, are transformed.  They bear the outward sign of having a shared experience and can forever after be identified with a certain group – be it a group of distinct social status, a certain ethnic unit, or a class of warriors.  They essentially manufacture esprit de corps, if only as a side-effect in the attempt to awe their enemies.  As widespread as both tattooing and warfare were around the globe, it should come as no surprise that the Britons were not the only, nor even the most well-known, group in history to have used tattooing in this way.

In 1778, Captain James Cook, famed British Naval explorer, landed at Waimea, on Kauai, in the Hawaiian Islands.  The ship’s surgeon noted that “The custom of tattooing prevails greatly among these people, but the men have a much larger share of it than the women; many (particularly some of the natives of Mowwhee) have half their body, from head to foot, marked in this manner, which gives them a most striking appearance.”  Or, as later French explorer Jacques Arago described it on the men from O’ahu:  they are  “tattooed only on one side, which produced a very singular effect; they looked just like men half burnt, or daubed with ink, from the top of the head to the sole of the foot.”  In Hawaii, these early observers noticed that the half-body tattoo seems to have been restricted to warriors.  Likewise, in the Marquesas Islands, an identical type of half-body tattoo was used by warriors there as well.  For these warriors, the tattoo was a form of disguise where only the tattooed half of the body was shown to an enemy in combat such that the warrior couldn’t be recognized by that same enemy in another encounter.


THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE EVERYONE THAT SACRIFICED YOUR LIFE FOR THE UNITED STATES!!!!

 

Welcome to Texas Body Art's online devotion to our armed services.

No matter what branch you are in we all have the same goal in mind

PROTECT OUR MAINLAND!!!

We know how much of a sacrifice you are making and we also know that many of you look forward to getting some new ink the first chance you get. We have put this page together in behalf of the MILITARY TATTOO and what it stands for ,where its been and where it is going.

FEEL FREE TO BROWSE THE HISTORY AND RESOURCES TO HELP GUIDE YOU IN YOUR SEARCH FOR THE PERFECT TATTOO FOR YOU.

BE SURE TO BOOKMARK US SO YOU DONT LOSE THE SITE AND BE SURE TO COME BACK AS WE WILL BE ADDING PHOTOS OF TATTOOS THAT WE DO ON SOLDIERS....

REMEMBER EVERY TATTOO IS A REFLECTION OF ONES OWN IDENTITY AND TO COPY THEM AND REPRODUCE THEM PROHIBITED by TEXAS BODY ART TATTOO STUDIO. We only encourage you to use these as ideas to ponder and design your own identity within....


                A FOREWORD  LISTED ON TATTOOS-AND-ART.COM WEBSITE REGARDING MILITARY TATTOOS

Members of the armed forces often choose to get military tattoos to display their pride in their service, their religions, the love for their fallen soldiers, and the pride they take in fighting for their country. A number of service members opt to get tattoos of the popular symbols that represent their service.  A marine may choose an EGA or a bulldog, a Seaman may choose an anchor.

Military tattoos often consist of memorials of fellow service members who were not as fortunate during their time on active duty. Some are tributes to whole units, others to wars and conflicts of the past such as Vietnam, Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Many service members also choose vintage or Americana themes such as pin-up girls, or American flag tattoos to show the pride they have in the history of the nation they are sworn to protect. These kinds of tattoos are most often obtained before the service member gets deployed or goes abroad.

Commonly known as a meat tag among service members, many choose to have their dog tags tattooed onto their ribcage. These particular tattoos often incorporate original design ideas to give them an individualized and personal touch. Ripped flesh and or a chain are the most common designs to go with meat tags. These military tattoos generally include the service members name, social security number, and religious preference.

As stated above, religious views are often included with military tattoos. Symbols including crosses, angels, the Star of David, are all common along with background graphics and phrases to represent the service members’ faith. Some have scripture references placed strategically within their tattoo for a visually appealing effect.

Military tattoos come in all different sizes, but more commonly are in highly visible locations. Arms and backs are very popular places to put these displays of pride and remembrance. Some service members choose to have these unique pieces of art covering their whole back while some choose to have smaller military tattoos that they can show off when not in uniform.

http://www.militarytattoo.org/

this website forms part of a project to keep alive the traditions of military tattoos.

http://www.everytattoo.com/military.shtml

a collection of ideas as tattoos from across the world.

http://www.eviltattoo.com/military.html

another collection of inked military designs

http://www.tattoo22.com/military.html

46 pages of designs


BEFORE YOU DECIDE ON A DESIGN....

There are two basic types of military tattoo designs, they are the modern and the historic ones. Usually, the tattoos which are of a historic military nature contain some logos and mottos which act as a representation of the men who have been famous in the fighting history. Meanwhile, the modern military tattoos indicate a representation of the different divisions or a certain artwork which have been used as the armed forces' smaller divisions. When you are getting these tattoo designs, there are some very basic guidelines that need to be followed.

For the personnel who are in the military, they must make sure that the tattoo they choose is in line with their particular branch's imposed codes. Most of the tattoos which these people get is placed on their upper arm so that they can be concealed with their uniform while they are on duty. In the military, there are some very specific requirements regarding tattoos.

For this reason, you have to make sure that you will not encounter some professional problems when you are in the military and get decide to get a military tattoo. Most of the tattoos worn by military soldiers imitate their unit device like the famous "Screaming Eagle" device which is often used by airborne soldiers. Even if these tattoos are often associated with the sailors, their popularity has even expanded to the other military branches.

In short, you must not choose the tattoo design of some modern military divisions if you have not yet served that division. This is because it is considered as an insult to those that have served in the division. It can even be compared to bragging about joining the military if you have, in fact, never served at all. Such tattoos should be considered off limits to those who have never served in the specific unit. Because of this, you should never get an advanced tattoo with this design, even if you are only making a presumption that you will be accepted in the particular unit.

With this in mind, if you would like to get a military tattoo but you're only an ordinary citizen, you can get the historical designs since they can be used by anyone and are sometimes used to represent a heartfelt connection with the warriors of a certain culture. The most popular designs of these kind include the Knights Templar crosses, mottos of the Spartans, Roman Legions, and Native Americans. Because these military tattoo designs look great, they can sometimes be the start of a conversation in a party.
 

http://www.militaryartgallery.com/

non tattoo related military art

http://www.usmilitaryart.com/

More cool ideas in art

GOOGLE MILITARY IMAGES

google has a huge selection of military art to get tattooed

IMAGES FROM BING.COM

Bing also has a huge selection of military art to get tattooed


These badges and logos are great ideas that can be incorporated into tattoos easily!

http://www.brandsoftheworld.com/categories/military/

Logos of the military by category

http://www.military-graphics.com/badges2.html

great graphics for military tattoos


http://www.army.mil/symbols/combatbadges/

ARMY combat badges

http://stores.uniforms-4you.com/-strse-US-Marine-Corps-Badges/Categories.bok

MARINE CORP BADGES

Navy Badges and logos

Navy seals and logos

http://www.iragreen.com/view/398/?gclid=CJvw5uOv_Z4CFQUeDQodcHi8Aw

AIR FORCE BADGES


FACTS ARE FACTS

tat·too 1  (t-t)
n. pl. tat·toos
1. A signal sounded on a drum or bugle to summon soldiers or sailors to their quarters at night.
2. A display of military exercises offered as evening entertainment.
3. A continuous, even drumming or rapping.
v. tat·tooed, tat·too·ing, tat·toos
v.intr.
To beat out an even rhythm, as with the fingers.
v.tr.
To beat or tap rhythmically on; rap or drum on.

[Alteration of Dutch taptoe, tap-shut (closing time for taverns), tattoo : tap, spigot, tap (from Middle Dutch tappe) + toe, shut (from Middle Dutch; see de- in Indo-European roots).]

tat·too 2  (t-t)
n. pl. tat·toos
1. A permanent mark or design made on the skin by a process of pricking and ingraining an indelible pigment or by raising scars.
2. A design made on the skin with a temporary dye such as henna or ink.
tr.v. tat·tooed, tat·too·ing, tat·toos
1. To mark (the skin) with a tattoo.
2. To form (a tattoo) on the skin.

[Of Polynesian origin.]

tat·tooer n.
tat·tooist n.
Word History: Although the practice of tattooing the body is very old, the English word tattoo is relatively new. The explorer Captain James Cook (who also gave us the word taboo) introduced the word to English speakers in his account of a voyage around the world from 1768 to 1771. Like taboo, tattoo comes from Polynesian languages such as Tahitian and Samoan. The earliest use of the verb tattoo in English is found in an entry for 1769 in Cook's diary. Sailors introduced the custom into Europe from the Pacific societies in which it was practiced, and it has remained associated with sailors, although many landlubbers now get tattoos as well.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


tattoo1

n pl -toos
1. (Military) (formerly) a signal by drum or bugle ordering the military to return to their quarters
2. (Military) a military display or pageant, usually at night
3. (Music, other) any similar beating on a drum, etc.
[from Dutch taptoe, from the command tap toe! turn off the taps! from tap tap of a barrel + toe to shut]

tattoo2

vb -toos, -tooing, -tooed
(Fine Arts & Visual Arts / Art Terms) to make (pictures or designs) on (the skin) by pricking and staining with indelible colours
n pl -toos
1. (Fine Arts & Visual Arts / Art Terms) a design made by this process
2. (Fine Arts & Visual Arts / Art Terms) the practice of tattooing
[from Tahitian tatau]
tattooer , tattooist n

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 6th Edition 2003. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

ThesaurusLegend:  Synonyms Related Words Antonyms
Noun 1. tattoo - a drumbeat or bugle call that signals the military to return to their quarters
bugle call - a signal broadcast by the sound of a bugle
 
drumbeat - (military) the beating of a drum as a signal for lowering the flag at sundown
 
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
  2. tattoo - a design on the skin made by tattooing
pattern, design, figure - a decorative or artistic work; "the coach had a design on the doors"
  3. tattoo - the practice of making a design on the skin by pricking and staining
decoration - the act of decorating something (in the hope of making it more attractive)
Verb 1. tattoo - stain (skin) with indelible color
stain - color with a liquid dye or tint; "Stain this table a beautiful walnut color"; "people knew how to stain glass a beautiful blue in the middle ages"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2008 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tattoo1 [təˈtuː]
1. n (on skin) → tatuaggio
2. vt → tatuare

tattoo1 [təˈtuː]

1. n (on skin) → tatuaggio
2. vt → tatuare

tattoo2 [təˈtuː] n (Mil) (signal) → ritirata; (show) → parata militare


tattoo2 [təˈtuː] n (Mil) (signal) → ritirata; (show) → parata militare

Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tattoo

v tattoo [təˈtuː, (American ) tӕ-]
to make coloured patterns or pictures on part of a person's body by pricking the skin and putting in dyes The design was tattooed on his arm.
n – plural tatˈtoos –
a design tattooed on the skin His arms were covered with tattoos.
adj tatˈtooed

 

MANY PEOPLE FIND A REASON TO GET TATTOOED AND MANY JUST LIKE THE ART

here is a collection of definitions of things so you can add meaning if you like....

http://www.tattoo-symbolism.com/category/military-tattoos/

AGAIN THANK YOU FOR VISITING AND REMEMBER TO TELL ALL YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY ABOUT OUR SITE AND TELL THEM TO JUST CLICK ON THE BOOTS ON OUR FRONT PAGE

Johnny Jackson's Texas Body Art

12537 Jones Road Houston, Texas 77070
Open SUN-THURS > NOON-1am
Open FRI-SAT > NOON-2am
Contact us at 281-894-2282
For piercing call 281-894-2227

Schedule an appointment online. CLICK HERE

TEXAS Body Art confronts drug and alcohol abuse seriously. We are committed to providing a drug-free environment. No one may use, possess, sell, transfer or purchase any illicit drugs or alcohol while on our premises.Artist's or customers. Texas Body Art is licensed and regulated by the State of Texas and the Texas Department of Health. We follow all the proper guidelines especially in regards to our sterilization methods and the cross contamination of blood-borne pathogens. You can be assured we use only the highest quality products for use in the Tattoo & Piercing Industries and we stay on top of all the latest developments in our field.

Absolutely no one under 18 can get tattooed ,even with a parent unless it is court ordered.IF YOU DONT HAVE STATE ISSUED ID YOU WILL NOT BE PIERCED OR TATTOOED.WE FOLLOW THE LAWS OF TEXAS.Minors must have a parent present and birth certificate as well as a valid ID,both names on the parent and the child have to be on the birth certificate as well both parent and minor wishing to get pierced must have ID to match the birth certificate.A school yearbook will work in the identification process.We apologize for any inconvienience this may cause but you need to bring all the proper documents if you plan on getting your minor pierced.NO EXCEPTIONS


PROPER CARE OF YOUR TATTOO


IN ORDER FOR YOU TO SUCCESSFULLY TAKE CARE OF YOUR NEW TATTOO YOU WILL NEED:

Answer
ANTIBACTERIAL SOAP (DIAL)

BETADINE OINTMENT (CLEAR) or AQUAPHOR

You never want to touch your new tattoo without washing your hands first.

1. For the first three nights while sleeping, keep the tattoo covered w/ saran wrap. Apply thin layer of ointment before doing so.

2. In the morning, remove saran wrap, wash w/ soap and water, apply thin layer of ointment. Be sure to rub the ointment in until it is gone.

3. You will need to wash area of work 2-3 times daily with warm soap and water, rinse, then apply thin layer of ointment. It is very important that you rub the ointment in until it is gone. (DO NOT GLOB IT ON OR IT WILL OOZE AND YOU RISK LOSING THE INK.)

4. Keep out of the sun, away from pools, lakes, hot tubs, or any type of chlorinated or salt water for at least two weeks. (CHLORINATED AND SALT WATER OF ANY KIND WILL EAT YOUR TATTOO!)

5. Do not pick or scratch your tattoo, if it itches it means it is dry so wash it with warm soap and water, apply thin layer of ointment. (IF YOU PICK YOUR TATTOO YOU RISK PULLING INK OUT!) The artist is not responsible for these damages.

6. If you follow these instructions there is no reason your tattoo should not heal up beautifully; we take great pride in our care of the work we do. If you stray from these instructions the individual artist is not responsible.

We appreciate your business and would like you to return.